Tamara Martsenyuk

Early marriage in Roma communities in Ukraine: cultural and socioeconomic factors

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Abstract

Abstract

This paper analyses the situation with regard to early marriage in Ukrainian society generally and in Roma communities particularly, while highlighting the importance of gender-based analysis in Roma studies. Empirical studies provide a focus on the cultural and socio-economic factors relevant to a discussion of the situation of Roma women in Ukraine who marry early, especially the sense of conflict they feel between traditional culture and modern society as they relate their experience of marriage.

 

Inna Melnykovska

Big Business and Politics in Ukraine: the Evolution of State-Business Relations

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Abstract

Abstract

Ukrainian big business has preserved its influence in Ukraine’s politics despite the political turmoil of the critical democratising junctures and reverse autocratic trends. Still, its relations with politics have changed from president to president. The article elaborates how the political embeddedness of Ukrainian big business evolved and what model of state-business relations developed in each presidential period. It demonstrates that Ukrainian big business increasingly relies on its ties with the country’s parliament to counterbalance the President’s powers. As a result, state-business relations have changed from a concentrated model to a diffuse one.

 

Maria Teteriuk

Gay Rights and Europeanization Processes in Eastern Europe: the Case of Bill 2342 "On Amendments to Some Legislative Acts of Ukraine Concerning the Prevention and Combating of Discrimination in Ukraine"

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Abstract

Abstract

The study examines the political framing of Bill № 2342, which proposed the prohibition of discrimination based on sexual orientation in the labor sphere in Ukraine. Nineteen distinct frames developed by key political actors and interest groups were identified, united into four master-frames. The failure of the proponents of Bill 2342 to make their frames dominant in the public discussion is explained by the lack of consolidation within the pro-camp. The most resourceful proponents (political elites) shared the opponents’ assumptions about homosexuality and LGB rights, which limited their ability to construct alternative frames. Heterogeneous frames developed by LGBT and human rights organizations did not provide any coherent response to the strong “traditional values/norms” frame used by the opponents from churches and the religious right. The study contributes to understanding the conditions for effective political framing strategies and their role in establishing and maintaining an anti-gay consensus on civil and economic rights in post-communist countries.

 

Oleksii Viedrov

From a mirror of Kharkiv society to leading environmental movement: the case of "Green Front"

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Abstract

Abstract

This article draws on the example of the Green Front, an environmental movement in Kharkiv, to show how the actors’ attention to the peculiarities of the local political and social context and available resources can help a social movement achieve considerable success. A movement without leadership, funded only by members, and broadly inclined to use direct action, the Green Front can be seen as a clear example of civic initiatives that present a growing alternative to professionalized and donor-funded NGOs in post-socialist countries. Though the initial campaign against road construction did not achieve its goal, some further campaigns were more successful. The Green Front has engaged in many environmental issues, established numerous contacts with other environmental groups in Ukraine and abroad, and begun lobbying at the national level. Its initial success was based on such factors as the entanglement of structural tensions present in the initial conflict in Kharkiv; its being a combination of a mass-movement and social-movement organization capable of expertise; its insistence on activating local inhabitants; and its successful positioning in the Ukrainian and regional political environments. 

 

Martin Brand

From De-Stalinization to New Authoritarianism: Welfare Development in Russia. A Literature Review

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Abstract

Abstract

The massive increase in individual and collective welfare since the second half of the 20th century is one of the central achievements of modern societies. On the welfare-state development of the democratic, capitalist countries of the West, there is correspondingly extensive research. The welfare development in Eastern Europe however has received thus far relatively little attention from the Western social sciences. Now three books have been published which address this lack and provide together an historical, longitudinal cross-section of the sociopolitical development in Russia, respectively in the USSR, since Stalin’s death.

 

emecon No 1/2015